Top 10 Robots Built by Boston Dynamics that Will Change the World




by Apoorva Bellapu

March 26, 2022

Boston Dynamics is known for creating exceptional robots that enrich the lives of people. With an ambition to build dynamically stable, legged machines, Boston Dynamics aims at transforming the lives of the people. The design of the robots is unique to the extent that they can conquer terrains inaccessible to others, and perform automated tasks in unstructured environments. The company has come up with innovative robots that have gained immense popularity over time. Here is a list of the top 10 robots built by Boston dynamics that will change the world.

 

BigDog

Boston Dynamics created this robot in 2005. This was done in conjunction with Foster-Miller, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the Harvard University Concord Field Station. BigDog doesn’t have wheels. It has four legs that it uses to move across surfaces. It gained recognition as the world’s most ambitious legged robot.

 

Cheetah

This is yet another four-footed robot built by Boston Dynamics that has seen a massive transformation since its launch. In 2012, it had set a land speed record for legged robots. By 2014, it could jump over obstacles while running and by 2018, this robot was in a position to climb stairs without any difficulty whatsoever.

 

LittleDog

LittleDog is a four-legged small Boston Dynamics robot that came into existence in 2010. This robot is powered by three electric motors. An interesting feature of this robot is that the sensors measure joint angles, motor currents, body orientation, and foot/ground contact. LittleDog is strong enough for climbing. The lithium polymer batteries are such that the robot can work for 30 minutes continuously without recharging. Well, this robot is definitely more than what its name indicates!

 

PETMAN

PETMAN is the abbreviation for “Protection Ensemble Test Mannequin”. This is nothing but a bipedal device that was mainly constructed for testing chemical protection suits. Well, the very fact that PETMAN is the first anthropomorphic robot that moves dynamically like a real person is something that definitely deserves a mention.

 

LS3

LS3 stands for “Legged Squad Support System”. This robot by Boston Dynamics is also known by the name “AlphaDog”. AlphaDog is also said to be a militarized version of BigDog. As evident as it can get, this robot was invented for military use and was designed in a manner that it can withstand hot, cold, wet, and dirty environments.

 

Atlas

Atlas is a humanoid robot built by Boston Dynamics. It is 5 feet tall and is based on Boston Dynamics’ PETMAN humanoid robot. What has caught the attention of people from everywhere across is the fact that it stands the potential to perform a variety of search and rescue tasks – tasks that are difficult or impossible for the previous generation of humanoid robots.

 

Spot

Spot is a four-legged Boston Dynamics’ robot that weighs about 25 kg – lighter than some of their other products. The company claims Spot to be the “quietest robot” that they have built. Spot has played a variety of roles – right from cheerleading, developing custom applications, inspecting to data collection.

 

Handle

Handle is a research robot founded by Boston Dynamics that is 2 m tall and travels at 9 miles per hour. It can jump up to 4 feet vertically as well. This robot has two flexible legs on wheels and two “hands” for manipulating or carrying objects.

 

Stretch

Stretch is yet another exclusive robot designed by Boston Dynamics in the year 2021 for the purpose of warehouse automation. This robot is powerful enough able to lift up to 50-pound objects using a suction cup array.

 

Pick

Boston Dynamics came up with “Pick” that is aimed at carrying boxes. This robot is quite similar to Stretch but the difference lies in the fact that Pick is fixed in a particular place. Yet another impressive feature of this robot is that it has the ability to identify a box in less than a second.

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